Detailansicht

When burglar alarms sound, do monitorial citizens pay attention to them? The online news choices of journalists and consumers during and after the 2008 U.S. election cycle

Boczkowski, P. J., Mitchelstein, E., & Walter, M.
Political Communication, 29 (S. 347–366).
2012

This study examines whether there is a thematic gap between the stories that journalists display most prominently and the stories consumers read most frequently in six mainstream American news sites. It looks at the choices of both groups in relation to each other and explores whether these choices vary in connection with the occurrence of a major political event, the 2008 presidential campaign. We find that during a time of routine political activity, there is a sizable gap between the news choices of journalists and consumers in which the former give more prominence to public affairs news (stories about politics, economics, and international topics) than the latter, but, during the campaign, this gap changes variously across the sites studied. Moreover, within the 2008 election cycle the predilection of journalists and consumers for public affairs news increases as election day nears, although journalists’ choices are thematically less variable than those of consumers. These findings contribute to the study of political communication by shedding light primarily on the dynamics of monitorial citizenship, and secondarily on issues of agenda setting and consumer behavior in high-choice media environments.

Zitation (APA)

Boczkowski, P. J., Mitchelstein, E., & Walter, M. (2012). When burglar alarms sound, do monitorial citizens pay attention to them? The online news choices of journalists and consumers during and after the 2008 U.S. election cycle. Political Communication, 29, 347–366.