Literatur zum Forschungsthema

Die aktuellen Veröffentlichungen zum Thema Framing(x)

Die aktuellen Veröffentlichungen zum Thema Framing(x)

A Source of Bias in Public Opinion Stability

Druckman, J. N., Fein, J., & Leeper, T. J. (2012). A Source of Bias in Public Opinion Stability. American Political Science Review, 106(2), 430–454.
Druckman, J. N., Fein, J., & Leeper, T. J.
American Political Science Review, 106 (2), (S. 430–454).
2012

A long acknowledged but seldom addressed problem with political communication experiments concerns the use of captive participants. Study participants rarely have the opportunity to choose information themselves, instead receiving whatever information the experimenter provides. Druckman and his co-authors relax this assumption in the context of an over-time framing experiment focused on opinions about health care policy.

Commenting in the Online Arab Public Sphere: Debating the Swiss Minaret Ban and the “Ground Zero Mosque” Online

Douai, A., & Nofal, H. K. (2012). Commenting in the Online Arab Public Sphere: Debating the Swiss Minaret Ban and the “Ground Zero Mosque” Online. Journal of Computer Mediated Communication, 17(3), 266–282.
Douai, A., & Nofal, H. K.
Journal of Computer Mediated Communication, 17 (3), (S. 266–282).
2012

This article focuses on the emerging online Arab public sphere that the web has enabled. It explores how the “local” interacts with the “global,” critically examining their implications on global politics.

Framing the Egyptian uprising in arabic language newspapers and social media

Hamdy, N., & Gomaa, E. H. (2012). Framing the Egyptian uprising in arabic language newspapers and social media. Journal of Communication, 62(2), 195–211.
Hamdy, N., & Gomaa, E. H.
Journal of Communication, 62 (2), (S. 195–211).
2012

This study examines the framing of Egypt’s January 2011 uprising in the country’s state-run, independent and social media using a unique dataset of Arabic language content from newspapers and key social media posts collected during the peak of protests. Semiofficial (governmental) newspapers framed the event as “a conspiracy on the Egyptian state,” warning of economic consequence and attributing blame and responsibility for the chaos on others. Social media posts used a human interest frame defining protests as “a revolution for freedom and social justice” and independent newspapers used a combination of these frames. Findings point toward the potential roles that news media will play in shaping public opinion and demonstrate why social media have wide appeal in times of political crisis.